Oh Fuck! (an unexpected series of events)

Sometimes life leads you to unexpected places. I thought I'd be on the Upper West Side of Manhattan but instead I'm in the South Bay, a densely populated beach community in Los Angeles county, where the architecture is mostly function mixed with some unfortunate form, and where most people's interests range from volleyball to surfing. Like anywhere, there are some good people here and I've made a few great friends. I write and produce music for a living, and make indie films, take photographs, and paint abstract expressionist paintings in my garage to keep myself sane. And I'm even learning to surf.
Cincinnati by day.

Cincinnati by day.

Queen City, place where I was born and raised.

Queen City, place where I was born and raised.

Looking out from Hermosa, over to Palos Verdes.

Looking out from Hermosa, over to Palos Verdes.

museumuesum:

Charlotte Perriand & Jean Prouvé
Bibliothèque Mexique, 1952
painted aluminum, steel, and pine, 63 x 72 x 12 in (160 x 183 x 30 cm)
The Bibliothèque Mexique emphasizes industrial materials, clean lines, and free-form shape. Its pleasing rhythm of colored panels and open spaces made it an engaging addition to the dormitories in the Maison du Mexique, a specialty dorm for Mexican students at the Cité Universitaire in Paris. Within the bookshelf, wooden horizontal elements are separated by modular painted aluminum panels that slide back and forth to configure the various compartments.
Earlier in her career, Charlotte Perriand had worked with architects Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret. As head of the “furniture equipment” division at Le Corbusier’s Parisian studio, Perriand introduced the machine age aesthetic to interiors, creating icons of 20th-century design. In the 1940s, Perriand spent six years in Asia, a period crucial to the development of her work. Her later forms and spaces were increasingly defined by the Japanese dynamics of “the void,” as evidenced by the compartments of the Bibliothèque.

I’m obsessed with this.

museumuesum:

Charlotte Perriand & Jean Prouvé

Bibliothèque Mexique, 1952

painted aluminum, steel, and pine, 63 x 72 x 12 in (160 x 183 x 30 cm)

The Bibliothèque Mexique emphasizes industrial materials, clean lines, and free-form shape. Its pleasing rhythm of colored panels and open spaces made it an engaging addition to the dormitories in the Maison du Mexique, a specialty dorm for Mexican students at the Cité Universitaire in Paris. Within the bookshelf, wooden horizontal elements are separated by modular painted aluminum panels that slide back and forth to configure the various compartments.

Earlier in her career, Charlotte Perriand had worked with architects Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret. As head of the “furniture equipment” division at Le Corbusier’s Parisian studio, Perriand introduced the machine age aesthetic to interiors, creating icons of 20th-century design. In the 1940s, Perriand spent six years in Asia, a period crucial to the development of her work. Her later forms and spaces were increasingly defined by the Japanese dynamics of “the void,” as evidenced by the compartments of the Bibliothèque.

I’m obsessed with this.

(via museumuesum)

Beautiful things grow to a certain height and then they fail and fade off, breathing out memories as they decay.

—F. Scott Fitzgerald

I wish I could write. I get these ideas but I never seem to be able to put them in words.

—F. Scott Fitzgerald (via coffeeurlgirl)

(Source: larmoyante, via xcelina)

There is one other book, that can teach you everything you need to know about life… it’s The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, but that’s not enough anymore.

—Kurt Vonnegut

surfastico:

Another day in SoCal

It’s cool to see a photo that was shot right down the street from where I live. I’m guessing this was from the Manhattan Beach Pier?

surfastico:

Another day in SoCal

It’s cool to see a photo that was shot right down the street from where I live. I’m guessing this was from the Manhattan Beach Pier?

(via hannahamassey)